UCSF Receives Toastmasters Recognition for Employee Engagement

Jim Kohli speaks during an event at the Mission Bay campus
Jim Kohli, Toastmaster’s Region 2 international director, speaks during an event to recognize UCSF for supporting its employees in developing their communication and leadership skills. Photo by Susan Merrell

UC San Francisco was recognized Wednesday by Toastmasters International for supporting its employees in developing their communication and leadership skills.

The educational nonprofit, which aims to empower individuals to become more effective communicators and leaders, presented UCSF its Corporate Recognition Award in a reception on the UCSF Mission Bay campus. Genentech also was a 2018 recipient of the award.

Sam Hawgood addresses Toastmasters members during a recognition ceremony at the Mission Bay campus
UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood, MBBS, addresses Toastmasters members during a recognition ceremony at the Mission Bay campus. Photo by Susan Merrell

“As a leading health sciences university and medical center, it is critical that we at UCSF effectively communicate our mission across our organization and to the public,” UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood, MBBS, said at Wednesday’s reception. “UCSF’s Toastmasters programs have been an important resource for our community to sharpen those skills and offer a wonderful opportunity to share and learn from one another.”

UCSF sponsors three Toastmasters clubs: Toastmasters for Health at Mission Bay, Toast of the Mission at Mission Center, and UC Oracles at Parnassus. Toastmasters for Health and Toast of the Mission also are open to the general community.

“Since the first club was chartered in 2001, UCSF Toastmasters clubs have benefitted more than 300 UCSF employees. UCSF further supports the Toastmasters program by hosting district events such as the Toastmasters Leadership Institute, Club Officer Training and Area/Division Contests, this way also supporting the growth and development of members throughout the district,” said Jim Kohli, Toastmaster’s Region 2 international director.

Since 1924, Toastmasters International has helped people from diverse backgrounds become more confident speakers, communicators and leaders. Headquartered in Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif., the organization's membership exceeds 352,000 in more than 16,400 clubs in 141 countries. 

Toastmasters clubs teach UCSF employees valuable skills, such as conducting effective meetings, practicing time management, sharpening presentation skills and guiding successful teams. 

“Toastmasters plays such a vital role in staff development, and you can see the growth almost immediately,” said Robert Mansfield, a program analyst at the UCSF Institute for Global Health Sciences, who leads the Toastmasters for Health club. “Not only is it a safe environment to learn to speak well, but the leadership and the listening play such an important part. Learning to give – and accept – feedback is instrumental to anyone’s growth.”