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July 20, 2012
The AIDS drug Truvada, approved this week for prevention of HIV infection in uninfected people at high risk, may benefit many uninfected women whose male partners have HIV, including pregnant women, who may be at higher risk.
July 20, 2012
A perspective published in the New England Journal of Medicine this week by professors at UCSF and the Johns Hopkins University asserts that it is now possible to begin to end the AIDS epidemic by widely and strategically applying existing tools.
July 20, 2012
Diane Havlir, MD, professor of medicine at UCSF and the chief of the UCSF Division of HIV/AIDS and Positive Health Program at San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center (SFGH), talks about the XIX international AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C. and her role as co-chair.
July 18, 2012
The year 1982 was pivotal for Paul Volberding, MD. In the early days of the AIDS crisis, he was a talented research fellow who was getting ready to help launch San Francisco General Hospital & Trauma Center’s Ward 86, which would become the world’s first HIV/AIDS outpatient clinic. It opened its doors the following year.
July 11, 2012
A declaration calling for global support to end the AIDS epidemic was announced on July 10 by the International AIDS Society, with key support from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).
July 11, 2012
The first U.S. meeting of the International AIDS Conference in more than two decades will be held later this month in Washington, DC, and Bay Area reporters got a preview of what UCSF researchers will present when they convene at the nation's capitol.
July 11, 2012
On the eve of the XIX International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C., UCSF's Jay Levy paused recently to reflect on HIV — a disease that has defined a generation, continues to plague the world and may yet be vanquished.
February 17, 2012
Paul Volberding, MD, one of the world's leading experts on treatment for patients infected with HIV, the AIDS virus, became the new director of the AIDS Research Institute (ARI) at UCSF on Feb. 13.
February 10, 2012
Scientists at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco have published a study showing that one of the most effective and commonly prescribed antiretroviral medications for HIV/AIDS, tenofovir, is associated with a significant risk of kidney damage and chronic kidney disease that increases over time. See accompanying news release, Tenofovir, Leading HIV Medication, Linked with Risk of Kidney Damage.
November 30, 2011
As we mark World AIDS Day this week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention reports that more than a million Americans now live with the disease, and every year some 50,000 people in the United States alone are newly infected.

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