Latest News

April 01, 2014
Doctors should focus on life expectancy when deciding whether to order mammograms for their oldest female patients, since the harms of screening likely outweigh the benefits unless women are expected to live at least another decade, according to a review of the scientific literature by experts at UCSF and Harvard medical schools.
January 29, 2014
UCSF Medical Center will name its new women’s hospital at Mission Bay in honor of Betty Irene Moore, a patient safety pioneer and advocate.
January 28, 2014
The funding will allow the UCSF team to continue to pursue development of the Smart Diaphragm, a wireless monitoring and warning system for early signs of preterm birth.
September 25, 2013
Claire Brindis, director of the UCSF Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, discusses the changes to health coverage under the Affordable Care Act for women and young adults.
August 06, 2013
UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital has one of the highest rates of "exclusive breastfeeding" – new mothers feeding only breast milk and no formula – in California, according to a new state report.
May 13, 2013
Researchers at UC San Francisco have found that giving small amounts of formula in the first few days of life to infants experiencing high levels of early weight loss actually can increase the length of time their mothers end up breastfeeding.
March 18, 2013
The American Cancer Society will pay tribute to Laura Esserman, MD, MBA, a nationally and internationally known leader in the field of breast cancer care and research, on March 19.
March 18, 2013
Screening for breast cancer every two years appears just as beneficial as yearly mammograms for women ages 50 to 74, with significantly fewer “false positives” – even for women whose breasts are dense or who use hormone therapy for menopause.
January 23, 2013
Ten years after the UCSF Mission Bay campus was established, UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay – the key patient-care component of the campus – is only two years away from opening.
December 14, 2012
The pelvic exam, a standard part of a woman’s gynecologic checkup, frequently is performed for reasons that are medically unjustified, according to a UCSF study that could lead to future changes to medical practice.

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