Latest News

September 17, 2014
To diagnose painful kidney stones in hospital emergency rooms, CT scans are no better than less-often-used ultrasound exams, according to a clinical study conducted at 15 medical centers.
August 04, 2014
In the first analysis of its kind, UCSF research shows that emergency department closures can have a ripple effect on patient outcomes at nearby hospitals.
March 10, 2014
Injured patients who live near trauma centers that have closed have higher odds of dying once they reach a hospital, according to a new analysis by UCSF researchers.
March 20, 2013
A new UCSF study shows that criteria used to determine the appropriateness of an emergency room visit and to deny payment is inherently flawed.
February 27, 2013
Emergency departments play a critical role in health care, yet consumers typically know little about how medical charges are determined and often underestimate their financial responsibility -- then are shocked when the hospital bill arrives.
December 06, 2012
Severe acute kidney injuries are becoming more common in the United States, rising 10 percent per year and doubling over the last decade, according to a retrospective study at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).
August 22, 2012
UCSF researchers found that poor HIV-infected individuals living in San Francisco are significantly more likely to visit emergency rooms and to have hospital stays if they lack access to food of sufficient quality and quantity for a healthy life.
August 06, 2012
Hospitals in areas with large minority populations are more likely to be overcrowded and to divert ambulances, delaying timely emergency care, according to a multi-institutional study focused on California.
April 24, 2012
According to a provocative new UCSF analysis, patients are all too often left in the dark about how and what hospitals charge for their medical care – even in the face of a mounting push nationally for consumers to have a voice in how their health care dollars are spent.
February 15, 2012
A major clinical trial conducted with patients experiencing a prolonged convulsive seizure has shown that injecting drugs into the thigh muscle is just as safe and more effective than giving the medication intravenously.

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