COVID-19

COVID-19

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by a virus named SARS-CoV-2 that was discovered in December 2019. The coronavirus is very contagious and has quickly spread around the world.

Learn more about how UCSF is working to keep our community safe

Influenza

Influenza

Last Updated: August 30, 2022

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at higher risk of serious flu complications.

Where can employees and learners get a flu vaccine at UCSF?

Faculty, staff, learners and volunteers can get a flu vaccine at various UCSF locations.

What do I need to do before getting a flu shot at UCSF?

All faculty, staff and learners must complete the Daily Health Screener prior to arriving at any vaccination clinic and must wear a mask while in the vaccination clinics, in elevators and on campus shuttles.

Where can UCSF Health patients get a flu vaccine?

UCSF offers flu shots for patients at clinics in San Francisco, San Mateo, Oakland, and Walnut Creek. Some clinics vaccinate adults, some vaccinate kids, and some do both. See below for clinic details, including locations, dates and times, and where to call for an appointment. For more information, visit UCSF Health flu shot clinics webpage.

Who should get a flu vaccine?

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a flu shot for most people age 6 months and older. During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it's more important than ever to be vaccinated because if flu season coincides with a another COVID-19 surge it could overwhelm our health systems.

The flu vaccine reduces the risk of infection, hospitalization and death. It also protects vulnerable individuals like children, the elderly and people with a weakened immune system (such as anyone with cancer), who are more likely to get severely ill.

The vaccine is especially important for people at higher risk of complications from the flu, including:

  • Pregnant women
  • People with certain medical conditions, including asthma, diabetes and chronic lung disease
  • People who live with or provide care to infants
  • Adults age 65 and older
  • Children age 5 and younger

More information about flu vaccines is posted on the CDC website.

MPX (Monkeypox)

MPX

Last Updated: August 30, 2022

MPX (pronounced em-pox), formerly called monkeypox, is a rare infectious disease that is transmitted through close contact and causes a rash on various parts of the body. The MPX virus is part of the same family of viruses as variola virus, the virus that causes smallpox. MPX symptoms are similar to smallpox symptoms but milder, and it is rarely fatal and most people recover without treatment in a few weeks.

Where can I get a MPX vaccine?

UCSF Health provides vaccination against MPX for all eligible people. You don't need to be a UCSF patient to schedule this vaccine at our clinic. Please do not come to UCSF's emergency department MPX vaccines or testing. To learn about vaccines at UCSF, visit the UCSF Health MPX webpage.

When can I get a second dose of the MPX vaccine?

Second doses for the MPX vaccine at UCSF Health can be scheduled at least 28 days after the first dose.

Who is eligible for a MPX vaccine?

If you have been exposed to monkeypox, getting vaccinated may keep you from getting sick. Vaccination is most effective within four days of exposure but can help up to 14 days later.

Vaccine supplies are limited and currently available only to high-risk populations, according to the San Francisco Department of Public Health. The following people who live and work in San Francisco are eligible to receive the vaccine:

  • Gay, bisexual, and other men or trans people who have sex with men
  • Sex workers of any sexual orientation or gender identity
  • People who had close contact in the past 14 days with someone who has suspected or confirmed monkeypox
  • People who had close contact in the past 14 days with others at a venue, event or social gathering where a suspected or confirmed monkeypox case was identified
  • Laboratory workers who routinely perform monkeypox virus testing
  • Care providers who had a high-risk exposure at work, such as handling monkeypox specimens without personal protective equipment

What do I need to do before getting a MPX vaccine at UCSF?

All faculty, staff and learners must complete the Daily Health Screener prior to arriving at any vaccination clinic and must wear a mask while in the vaccination clinics, in elevators and on campus shuttles.

Public Health Resources

Public Health Resources

During an emergency, local, state and national public health agencies will have the most up-to-date information and resources available to your local community.

Bookmark these agencies for ongoing updates as public health situations emerge and evolve: