Latest News

May 05, 2011
UCSF's basic research over nearly two decades has led to the first novel antitoxin to treat botulism in nearly a century – becoming the first recombinant human therapy to target one of the most dangerous substances known to man and offering a new defense against bioterrorism.
May 04, 2011
Blending state-of-the art technology and cutting-edge design, UCSF’s new cardiovascular research building at Mission Bay integrates basic and clinical research to address important questions in cardiovascular biology and disease. 
May 03, 2011
Alexander D. Johnson, PhD, and Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD, have been elected as members of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for their excellence in original scientific research.
May 03, 2011
Sugar is a poison, and conventional thinking about the role of hormones in metabolism is wrong, according to UCSF pediatrician Robert Lustig. His work is gaining attention in the mainstream media. 
April 29, 2011
The U.S. Federal Court of Appeals has overturned an August 2010 ban on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research, paving the way for broader exploration of how stem cells function and how they can be harnessed to treat a wide range of currently incurable diseases.
April 28, 2011
A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco may have uncovered a new wrinkle in the genetic code – an entirely unrecognized way our bodies regulate how genes are expressed in different tissues throughout life.
April 28, 2011
His Highness the Aga Khan recently visited UCSF to gain insight into the driving forces behind UCSF’s excellence in research and education, and receive the University’s highest honor, the UCSF Medal.
April 27, 2011
Richard K. Olney, MD, the founding director of the ALS Treatment and Research Center at UCSF and a pioneer in ALS clinical research, pushes to complete a clinical research paper, even as he nears the end of his own struggle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
April 26, 2011
Scientists are making great strides in figuring out how the human brain develops, which are leading to novel ideas about the causes of a range of brain disorders, and are raising hopes for the regeneration of tissue that is lost in diseases such as Alzheimer’s. 
April 26, 2011
Men and women had starkly different immune system responses to chronic post-traumatic stress disorder, with men showing no response and women showing a strong response, in two studies by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco.

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