Latest News

October 18, 2013
The UCSF-affiliated Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center has issued a second round of grants to accelerate the discovery and development of new medications to treat alcohol and substance abuse in the context of post-traumatic stress and combat injury.
October 17, 2013
In recent years, studies have reported inconsistent findings regarding whether calcium supplements used to prevent fractures increase the risk of heart attack.
October 16, 2013
A UCSF-led team of scientists has discovered that a gene mutation found in some bladder cancers is indicative of low-risk tumors that are unlikely to recur or progress after surgery.
October 15, 2013
The Science of Staying Younger Longer is a by-invitation symposium and panel discussion highlighting advances in scientific understanding of the biological underpinnings of aging and ideas for how to slow down age-associated disease and decline.
October 14, 2013
Through support from the Catalyst Awards, UCSF researcher Aditi Bhargava is working to develop a method for delivering small-molecules to a specific target group of cells for treatment of pain.
October 14, 2013
A UCSF opthamologist and bioengineer are collaborating to develop a tiny, flexible, implantable film that's able to deliver conventional medicines and also complex antibody-based drugs to treat eye diseases.
October 14, 2013
A team of UCSF researchers developing cell-based therapies for acute respiratory distress syndrome benefited from advisors who helped identify gaps in their development plan.
October 14, 2013
Teams of scientists at UCSF are collaborating to build upon existing imaging techniques and find new ways to monitor diseases using creative applications of emerging technologies.
October 14, 2013
Ruben Rathnasingham, PhD, associate director of Early Translational Research at UCSF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute, is leading the team responsible for LaunchPad. In this Q&A, he discusses the project and how it can benefit researchers.
October 11, 2013
The way cells divide to form new cells – to support growth, to repair damaged tissues, or simply to maintain our healthy adult functioning – is controlled in previously unsuspected ways, UCSF researchers have discovered.

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