Latest News

April 29, 2014
Over the past 18 months, physicians in California have observed on rare occasions what may be a new disease, one in which patients, usually children, quickly and permanently lose muscle function in an arm or leg.
April 24, 2014
As we mark World Malaria Day this year, UCSF’s Global Health Group is celebrating the success of Namibia, where malaria case have dropped 98 percent over the past decade.
December 12, 2013
UC San Francisco’s Global Health Group has received a $15 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for a pioneering effort to help nearly three dozen countries eliminate malaria within their borders.
July 24, 2013
UCSF researchers are recommending six comprehensive measures to prevent the spread of hepatitis C for the estimated 31,000 young people who may be newly infected each year in the U.S. due to injection-drug use.
August 29, 2012
Despite nearly three decades of conflict, Sri Lanka has succeeded in reducing malaria cases by 99.9 percent since 1999 and is on track to eliminate the disease entirely by 2014.
June 20, 2012
Liver cancer is expected to become more common in the United States in coming years. “It’s deadly and it’s preventable,” says UCSF physician and researcher Tung Nguyen, MD.
June 20, 2012
Viral hepatitis chronically infects between 3.5 and 5.2 million people in the U.S. and more than 30,000 in San Francisco, alone — but only about one in three people who are infected know it, according to a report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
June 20, 2012
At the edge of a San Francisco neighborhood that has been riddled with drug addiction for decades, UCSF epidemiologist Kimberly Page, PhD, MPS, leads a research team that provides outreach, screening and prevention programs for drug users, those who are especially vulnerable to hepatitis C infection.
May 30, 2012
After being infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in a laboratory study, rhesus macaques that had more of a certain type of immune cell in their gut than others had much lower levels of the virus in their blood, and for six months after infection were better able to control the virus.
May 21, 2012
A team of researchers from UCSF and UC San Diego has identified an approved arthritis drug that is effective against amoebas in lab and animal studies, suggesting it could offer a low-dose, low cost treatment for the amoebic infections that cause human dysentery throughout the world.

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