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HUGE NEWS: “For the first time, this study demonstrates that we can generate entire spoken sentences based on an individual’s brain activity."
- UCSF professor of neurological surgery Edward Chang.
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The technology could one day restore the voices of people who have lost the ability to speak due to paralysis and other forms of neurological damage.
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Learn more at the link in our bio!
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#science #UCSF #neuroscience #neuro #speechprosthesis #brainmachineinterface #technologyThis is a human immune cell. Scientists are engineering cells like these to hunt down and destroy cancer inside the body. But we're not stopping there. The promise of cell programming could extend to dementia, congenital heart disease and spinal injury.
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This type of medicine is called immunotherapy. Here’s how it’s done:
1. Scientists remove T cells from a patient’s body with a simple blood draw.
2. Then they use a neutered virus to modify the DNA of the T cell to produce receptors that will recognize cancer cells.
3. Once modified, the cells are put back into the patient.
4. Now able to detect cancer cells as pathogens, the modified T cells hunt them down and kill them.
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Follow us for more science, medicine and community stories!
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#ucsf #research #cells #cellfie #cancer #science #immunotherapy💀 Can you identify famous case that inspired this 3D printed skull?
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Hint: His case was among the first to show that brain injury could result in specific personality changes.
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This model was printed in UCSF’s Skull Base & Cerebrovascular Laboratory. It took nearly 50 hours to print, but cost only $1 in materials.
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#ucsf #research #scicomm #skull #brainBreathe in, breathe out…enjoying a moment of peace at the UCSF Library 📚
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Where is your favorite UCSF chill spot? Let us know in the comments below!
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#ucsf #highered #meded #spring #libraryHaircuts Plus Health Care 💈: UCSF doctors are training barbers in Oakland and San Francisco to aid in the fight against heart disease, especially among African-American men.
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When UCSF doctor Kenji Taylor’s father passed away suddenly from a heart attack, his story was not uncommon. AfAm men have the highest rates of hypertension and hypertension-related death of any demographic group, and Taylor’s father likely suffered from undiagnosed hypertension. Taylor’s father had never seen a doctor because he was uninsured and deeply mistrusted the medical system.
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Taylor created the Cut Hypertension Program, which trains barbers to be health coaches who provide ongoing screenings, education and referrals to primary care providers.
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“Being able to go out to the barbershop is a great way to not only start a conversation about hypertension but also show African-American men that they can have trusting relationships with health care providers,” Kenji says.
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📷: Barbers Joseph Peters (seated) and Terell Kennedy learn to test and counsel clients for high blood pressure at Benny Adem Grooming Parlor in Oakland. Photo by Noah Berger.
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#ucsf #health #barbershop #barberconnect #barberlife #hypertension #bloodpressure #trapmedicine #cuthypertensionDID YOU KNOW: In the modern workplace, employees often juggle 15 tasks at once. Whether clicking through dozens of tabs on browsers, taking impromptu “standup” meetings or responding to constant “pings” from email and chat programs, UCSF neuroscientist Adam Gazzaley warns that our brains simply don’t have the bandwidth to keep up.
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Gazzaley, who studies attention and focus, shares 3 strategies for dealing with our hyper-connected world:
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1. Limit “clutter” in your tech life - close email programs when working on tasks and limit yourself to one browser tab at a time. 
2. Take breaks during particularly challenging tasks to spend time in nature, get some light exercise, or consider mindfulness routines. 
3. Give yourself room to work by setting proper expectations with your colleagues on when you are and are not available.
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TEST YOUR FOCUS! If you made it to the end of this post, comment below and include the brain emoji 🧠.“Some of my most creative ideas I’ve had when I’m out on a run, giving the baby a bath, or taking my daughter to the park,” says Jessica Jencek. “Work is a part of life, and life is a part of work. Walling them off doesn’t benefit anyone.”
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That’s a lesson Jencek, an assistant vice chancellor at UCSF, learned through experience. “After I returned from maternity leave, and prior to my time at UCSF, a well-intentioned boss told me I just needed to compartmentalize: Think about work at work and think about my family at home,” Jencek remembers.
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“I took his advice for a brief time, but it failed for me, especially coming back from this huge life event,” she says. “I had postpartum depression, and I couldn’t not think about my family. Even when you’re a working parent,  you’re still a full-time parent. And when you’re parenting, you’re thinking about work – which is a good thing!”
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Jencek and her team have raised millions of dollars for clinical, basic, and translational science at UCSF. She was named to the 2019 @SFBusiness Times “40 under 40 list.”
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This Women’s History Month, join us in saluting trailblazing #UCSFWomen making history in health and science.
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#UCSF #UCSFWomen #WomensHistoryMonth #WHM #WMH2019 #fundraising #UCSFProud #womeninSTEMDID YOU KNOW? The Bay Area’s first children’s hospital was created by a team of pioneering women. It was called the Baby Hospital when it was founded in 1912, and still serves children throughout the Bay Area and beyond as UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals.
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Bertha Wright (first photo) was an Alameda County nurse when she met Mabel Weed (second photo), a social worker. They envisioned a hospital in Oakland that would care for children and babies regardless of a family’s ability to pay, a philosophy that the hospital maintains today.
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Wright and Weed partnered with other Bay Area women to bring this vision to life.
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This Women's History Month, join us in saluting trailblazing #UCSFWomen in health and science.
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Learn more at the link in our bio ➡️.
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#UCSF #UCSFProud #UCSFWomen #WomenInMedicine #WomensHistoryMonth #WomensHistory #History #WHM2019 #WHM“Gender and race have frequently been something I have been aware of over my life and career,” says Mignon Loh, a pediatric oncologist at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals.
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“[I was] one of three Asians in my public school in New Jersey, and [in a private high school] I lost a student government presidency race by a handful of votes. [Afterward], I heard a white boy loudly assert that he would never vote for a “ching chong china man chink” to be his student government president. And in medical school, some colleagues thought I had been given given special dispensation and admission because of my gender.”
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But Loh has never faltered in her conviction that she is on the right path. “I love what I do and my belief that I can make a difference propels me through difficult times,” she says.
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In addition to providing world-class care to pediatric cancer patients, Loh has led breakthrough work revealing a direct link between an inherited genetic mutation, a set of developmental abnormalities, and a rare form of childhood leukemia.
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This Women's History Month, join us in saluting trailblazing #UCSFWomen making history in health and science. .
#ucsf #UCSFWomen #UCSFProud #WomenInMedicine #WomenAtWork #meded #medicine #pediatrician

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