Latest News

September 14, 2014
Juliana's Journey Foundation - established in honor of two-and-a-half-year-old Juliana Peña, who passed away in 2012 from brain cancer - recently gave $15,000 to UCSF's Kate Matthay, MD, to develop treatments for neuroblastoma.
September 04, 2014
Katie Kelley, MD, a gastrointestinal oncologist at UC San Francisco, has received the 2014 Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI).
August 24, 2014
When urologist Peter Carroll, MD, MPH, did his residency at UCSF 30 years ago, cancer was “a word that was whispered,” a knowledgeable patient was someone who just followed doctor’s orders and oftentimes a diagnosis wasn’t made until disease was advanced.
August 15, 2014
It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us – which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold – may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity.
August 07, 2014
New research partly led by UCSF-affiliated scientists suggests that one in 10 cancer patients would be more accurately diagnosed if their tumors were defined by cellular and molecular criteria rather than by the tissues in which they originated.
July 15, 2014
UCSF Medical Center is among the nation's premier hospitals for the 13th consecutive year, ranking as the eighth best hospital in the country according to U.S. News & World Report.
July 10, 2014
Twitter and other social media should be better utilized to convey public health messages, especially to young adults, according to a new analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco.
June 25, 2014
UCSF scientists have shown that cancer-induced structural changes in a sugary coating ensheathing cells can promote mechanical interactions that fuel tumor growth and metastasis.
June 18, 2014
The Ras protein is one of the most common and deadly drivers of cancer, yet it has eluded any drug therapies for decades. Scientists are getting close to changing that.
June 08, 2014
New genomic research led by UCSF scientists reveals that two common gene variants that lead to longer telomeres also significantly increase the risk of developing the deadly brain cancers known as gliomas.

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