Latest News

February 03, 2010
UCSF researchers have identified an elusive molecular regulator that controls the ability of human sperm to reach and fertilize the egg, a finding that has implications on both treating male infertility and preventing pregnancy.
February 03, 2010
UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann outlines a vision for faster development of better, cheaper drugs to fight cancer.
February 03, 2010
Douglas Bettcher, director of the World Health Organization’s Tobacco Free Initiative, will talk about reining in Big Tobacco during a symposium at UCSF on February 12.
February 01, 2010
Matthew Springer, an associate professor of medicine at UCSF, is again conducting earthquake preparedness talks at several campus locations beginning today (February 1.)
January 29, 2010
A UCSF analysis of published studies on the relationship between Alzheimer’s disease and smoking indicates that smoking cigarettes is a significant risk factor for the disease.
January 25, 2010
A federal pediatric advisory committee has voted unanimously to include a screening test for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency, or SCID, in the core panel of newborn screening performed nationwide. The Federal Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children formally recommended the screen January 21.
January 22, 2010
With numerous personnel waiting to board planes to the earthquake zone, concerned students, faculty and staff are busy raising money and collecting medical supplies to assist the victims.
January 20, 2010
Reducing salt in the American diet by as little as one-half teaspoon (or three grams) per day could prevent nearly 100,000 heart attacks and 92,000 deaths each year, according to a new study. Such benefits are on par with the benefits from reductions in smoking and could save the United States about $24 billion in healthcare costs, the researchers add.
January 20, 2010
Low vitamin D blood levels are associated with a significantly higher risk of relapse attacks in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who develop the disease during childhood, according to a study conducted by researchers from UCSF.
January 20, 2010
Non-smokers with both long-term exposure to second-hand cigarette smoke and narrowing of the artery that brings blood to the brain had three times the risk of developing dementia than people without either of those risk factors, according to a study led by a researcher at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.

Pages