Latest News

September 09, 2011
Mental illnesses, especially depression and anxiety disorders, are common in the United States and Europe according to two new major research reports. They often are untreated, and they are associated with chronic, life threatening health problems, including heart disease.
July 18, 2011
Janice Humphreys, a associate professor of Family Health Care Nursing, is working with an interdisciplinary group of UCSF colleagues to study the long-term health and aging effects of intimate partner violence with funding made possible by UCSF’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute.
April 04, 2011
UCSF scientists are reporting several studies showing that psychological stress leads to shorter telomeres – the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes that are a measure of cell age and, thus, health. The findings also suggest that exercise may prevent this damage.
February 03, 2011
UCSF Nobel laureate Elizabeth Blackburn is not ready to predict how long you will live. But she and her UCSF colleagues are exploring a feature within cells that is a kind of hourglass for aging.
January 26, 2011
Early diagnosis and treatment can make a big difference for patients with schizophrenia. Unfortunately, diagnosis often is delayed for months or years.
December 16, 2010
Cystatin C, a blood marker of kidney function, proved significantly more accurate than the standard blood marker, creatinine, in predicting serious complications of kidney disease, in a study by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and UCSF.
November 03, 2010
UCSF Nobel laureate Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, and researcher Elissa Epel, PhD, are co-authors with UC Davis scientists of a paper showing that the positive psychological changes that occur during meditation training are associated with greater activity of the enzyme telomerase.
May 26, 2010
Exercise can buffer the effects of stress-induced cell aging, according to new research from UCSF that revealed actual benefits of physical activity at the cellular level.
February 10, 2010
Among soldiers who served in Iraq, the act of taking a life in combat was a significant predictor of post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol abuse, hostility and anger, and relationship problems, according to a study led by a psychologist at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.
February 09, 2010
Between 2002 and 2008, fewer than 10 percent of U.S. veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan who were newly diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder received the recommended course of care for their condition at VA health facilities, according to a study by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and UCSF.

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