Latest News

October 16, 2013
A UCSF-led team of scientists has discovered that a gene mutation found in some bladder cancers is indicative of low-risk tumors that are unlikely to recur or progress after surgery.
September 04, 2013
UCSF will receive $4.5 million for a pilot project to assess whether large-scale gene sequencing can and should become a routine part of newborn testing.
August 12, 2013
Researchers have probed deep into the cell’s genome to begin learning the “grammar” that helps determine whether or not a gene gets switched on to make the protein it encodes, advancing efforts to use gene and cell-based therapies to treat disease.
June 24, 2013
A UCSF-led research team has identified the likely genetic mechanism that causes some patients with multiple sclerosis to quickly progress to a debilitating stage of the disease while other patients progress much more slowly.
June 13, 2013
The scientific community at UCSF is reacting positively to the Supreme Court’s unanimous ruling that human genes cannot be patented.
March 14, 2013
Improving technologies are rapidly cutting the cost of whole genome sequencing, a process that reveals the complete library of a patient’s genetic information. UCSF School of Pharmacy's Kathryn Phillips, PhD, will lead the first national study to analyze how physicians and patients evaluate the benefits and risks posed by this profusion of information.
February 13, 2013
UCSF researchers have discovered a molecular machine that helps protect a cell’s genes against invading DNA that contributes to inherited human disease and death.
November 21, 2012
People with the shortest telomeres really do have a date with the Grim Reaper, according to new data coming out of the largest and most diverse genomics, health and longevity project in the nation.
November 14, 2012
Personalized medicine advances arising from genetic discoveries were the primary focus of wide-ranging presentations at the UCSF Institute for Human Genetics 2012 Symposium on Nov. 5.
October 09, 2012
Scientists at the UCSF-affiliated Gladstone Institutes have mapped the precise frequency by which genes get turned on across the human genome, providing new insight into the most fundamental of cellular processes — and revealing new clues as to what happens when this process goes awry.

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