Latest News

September 09, 2004
UCSF leaders are recommending a bold plan to establish state-of-the-art, technologically advanced patient care facilities at three major sites as part of a long-term vision to advance UCSF's education, research and health care missions.
September 09, 2004
Bacteria thrive on it, red blood cells carry it in high concentration, yet the human brain can't tolerate it. The ability of cells to acquire or dispose of ammonia can be a matter of life and death.
August 31, 2004
UCSF Medical Center is bringing together cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, interventional radiologists, vascular surgeons and other specialists to form a new UCSF Heart and Vascular Center.
August 30, 2004
Scientists have determined the precise molecular structure of a potential new target for treating prostate cancer, a disease driven in part by abnormal testosterone activity.
August 29, 2004
An enzyme found in nearly all animal and human cells acts as a natural brake to prevent potentially deadly runaway inflammation, UCSF scientists have discovered.
August 27, 2004
Recent discoveries about the way that HIV infects cells are propelling the development of a broad spectrum of promising new antiviral drugs, according to an invited commentary on the topic in the current issue of Nature Immunology (August 27, 2004).
August 26, 2004
A new mobile eye service operated by UCSF Medical Center and San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center will soon be winding its way through San Francisco ...
August 24, 2004
Scientists have determined the precise molecular structure of a potential new target for treating prostate cancer, a disease driven in part by abnormal testosterone activity. The target is part of the androgen receptor, a protein essential for testosterone to function in human cells. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men.
August 23, 2004
Scientists have determined the precise molecular structure of a potential new target for treating prostate cancer, a disease driven in part by abnormal testosterone activity.
August 18, 2004
A defect in the action of a newly discovered protein may play a central role in muscular dystrophy, a disease of progressive muscle degeneration with no known cure.

Pages