Latest News

October 26, 2010
The UCSF Challenge for the Children, a collaboration with the online fundraising platform Causes.com, kicks off today (Oct. 26, 2010) as part of the groundbreaking festivities for the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay, site of the future children’s hospital as well as women’s and cancer hospitals.
October 25, 2010
The community is invited to celebrate a significant milestone in the success story that is UCSF Mission Bay – the long-awaited groundbreaking of a state-of-the-art and sustainable medical center on October 27.
October 22, 2010
UCSF will hold a groundbreaking ceremony on Tuesday, October 26 for the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay, a world-class hospital complex for children, women and cancer patients.
October 08, 2010
A woman’s race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status impact whether health care providers recommend one of the most highly effective forms of contraception, a UCSF study confirms. The results also indicate that the interaction of both factors plays a role in clinicians’ decisions.
September 16, 2010
Fourth-year medical student Jamila Harris, who saw community members in her native San Francisco neighborhood struggle to navigate the health system, explains her drive to become a doctor.
August 03, 2010
Testosterone in men has become a hot health topic. New studies, including one by UCSF researchers, now are sparking a controversy over the role of testosterone in heart disease.
July 19, 2010
Shane Snowdon, director of the LGBT Resource Center at UCSF, has been named an LGBT “Local Hero” by KQED TV.
June 29, 2010
Playing soccer with kids in the Western Addition is one of the ways Chief Pediatric Resident Sonny Tat works to improve public health as part of the University Community Partnership program.
June 23, 2010
Marc Benioff explained his excitement about building a new children’s hospital at Mission Bay and encouraged others to get involved in the project on June 22, when he officially announced his gift of $100 million to UCSF.
April 28, 2010
For the first time, scientists have discovered a way to predict whether women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) – the most common form of non-invasive breast cancer – are at risk of developing more invasive tumors in later years.

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