Latest News

January 28, 2005
Faculty and staff are invited to help plan for programs slated for new clinical facilities at UCSF Mission Bay during a morning session on Wednesday, Feb. 2.
January 28, 2005
A secret ingredient isolated from the sweat of young women may be a romance booster for older women, according to an article in New Scientist magazine. Researchers added a compound, Pheromone 10:13, to a perfume and tested it along with a placebo with the same fragrance on 44 post-menopausal women. Among pheromone users, 41% reported more petting, kissing and affection with partners, while only 14% of placebo users reported an increase in affection from their partners.
January 27, 2005
As the year 2005 is well under way, UCSF employees are encouraged to take a good look at wellness programs offered by health plans.
January 27, 2005
Eating fish that is baked or broiled may be healthy, but fried fish isn't. Harvard researchers studied 4,700 older people and found that those who ate broiled or baked fish one to two times a month had a 14% reduced risk of stroke and those who ate it five or more times a week had a 32% lower risk. But eating fried fish or fish sandwiches was associated with a 37% higher risk of all types of stroke and a 44% higher risk of ischemic stroke, the kind that occurs when a clot blocks an artery. The study appeared in the Archives of Internal Medicine.
January 26, 2005
Italian doctors are warning, especially young people, that excessive text messaging could lead to acute tendonitis in the fingers. The warning got a lot of attention in newspapers, which told the story of a 13-year-old girl who needed special orthopedic treatment after typing 100 short messages a day on her cell phone. According to a recent study, some 37% of Italian children are "cell phone addicts," and irritability and mood swings were other symptoms.
January 26, 2005
February is the month for Valentine's Day, but hearts of another sort will be discussed in detail as the campus hosts seminars about cardiovascular health.
January 25, 2005
The University of California's Board of Regents at its meeting Jan. 19 reviewed the state's Master Plan for Higher Education and discussed the importance of investing in graduate education to help keep California competitive.
January 25, 2005
What's bad for the heart may be bad for the brain, too. A study of 9,000 people by the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland found that those who have high blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes or who smoke in midlife have a much higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. For example, those with high cholesterol were 42% more likely to develop dementia. Those with all four risk factors had more than double the risk of Alzheimer's.
January 24, 2005
The Asian Health Caucus, a student group at UCSF, is holding a bone marrow drive on Monday, Jan. 31, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., in the Medical Sciences Building on the Parnassus campus.
January 24, 2005
A daily glass of beer or wine may help sharpen the minds of women into old age. Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School studied some 12,500 nurses and found that moderate drinkers aged 70 to 81 were 20% less likely to experience a decline in their thinking skills over a two-year period than women who did not drink at all. On average, those who drank a beer or glass of wine each day tended to have the mental agility of someone a year and a half younger than abstainers. The study appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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