Latest News

June 26, 2014
In a new study by UC San Francisco scientists, running, when accompanied by visual stimuli, restored brain function to normal levels in mice that had been deprived of visual experience in early life.
June 25, 2014
In the first national survey of U.S. obstetricians’ attitudes towards counseling pregnant patients about environmental health hazards, nearly 80 percent agreed that physicians have a role to play in helping patients reduce their exposures, but only a small minority use their limited time with patients to discuss how they might avoid exposure to toxics.
June 25, 2014
UCSF scientists have shown that cancer-induced structural changes in a sugary coating ensheathing cells can promote mechanical interactions that fuel tumor growth and metastasis.
June 24, 2014
UC San Francisco and the University of Nebraska Medical Center have been awarded a $10 million grant from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation to create a new web-based model of dementia care.
June 18, 2014
The Ras protein is one of the most common and deadly drivers of cancer, yet it has eluded any drug therapies for decades. Scientists are getting close to changing that.
June 18, 2014
Parents who have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are about one third less likely to have more children than families without an affected child, according to a study led by a UC San Francisco researcher.
June 12, 2014
In the most comprehensive study of the Mexican population to date, researchers from UCSF and Stanford University, along with Mexico’s National Institute of Genomic Medicine, have identified tremendous genetic diversity.
June 11, 2014
A team of researchers studying a flowering plant has zeroed in on the way cells manage external signals to adapt to prevailing conditions, a capability that is essential for cells to survive in a fluctuating environment.
June 10, 2014
Joshua Osborn was fighting for his life against a mysterious ailment. With his options dwindling, a team at UCSF employed advanced DNA sequencing technology to track down the culprit.
June 08, 2014
New genomic research led by UCSF scientists reveals that two common gene variants that lead to longer telomeres also significantly increase the risk of developing the deadly brain cancers known as gliomas.

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