Latest News

September 29, 2010
A particularly aggressive childhood cancer can be fought successfully with far less chemotherapy than previously believed, avoiding harmful side effects caused by cancer drugs.
September 28, 2010
Surgical patients with known heart disease risks who are given beta blockers around the time of surgery have a significantly reduced risk of post-operative death compared with patients not given beta blockers, according to a study by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.
September 24, 2010
Diabetes research is on the cusp of new advances in treatment options and in understanding the underlying causes of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Among those are potential treatments using stem cells to regenerate a patient’s ability to produce insulin, as well as upcoming clinical trials of a vaccine that potentially could prevent type 1 diabetes.
September 24, 2010
Renown Institute for Cancer in Reno and the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, the two leading cancer programs in their regions, have joined forces to enhance patient care and improve access to top level medical experts.
September 24, 2010
Basic physical limitations following breast cancer treatment can have far-reaching consequences that substantially affect how long a patient lives.
September 21, 2010
An inexpensive, hundred-year-old therapy for pain – aspirin – is effective in high doses for the treatment of severe headache and migraine caused by drug withdrawal, according to a new study by researchers with the UCSF Headache Center.
September 21, 2010
Cancer and infertility can be a double blow. Many women become infertile following cancer treatment. And because more women are living longer thanks to modern chemotherapy and radiation treatment, more are later discovering that they cannot bear children.
September 10, 2010
The UCSF community is encouraged to donate blood for the victims of the fire in San Bruno.
September 09, 2010
A method that is widely used to predict the risk of a major coronary event may over- or underestimate risk for millions of Americans, according to a study directed by a researcher at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco.
September 07, 2010
UCSF scientists will receive two grants totaling $15.1 million over the next five years to expand their research into how genes affect an individual’s response to medication and to strengthen a global network of researchers involved in these efforts.

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