Latest News

October 24, 2002
By experimentally switching genes off or on at specific stages in an animal’s lifecycle, UCSF scientists have discovered that vigor and lifespan can be significantly extended with no side effects. Many researchers believe that increasing lifespan will dampen reproduction. But the new study of the tiny roundworm commonly known as C. elegans shows that silencing a key gene only in adulthood increases longevity with no effect on reproduction.
October 24, 2002
The statewide California Poison Control System (CPCS) urges parents to follow these safety precautions to assure that kids enjoy the fun of trick-or-treating without running into hazards in items collected on Halloween: * Before the Kids Go Out to Collect Treats * Tell them to not eat treats until they return home and you have checked all items. * Reduce temptation to eat treats before returning home. Feed kids before trick-or-treating, or give them a snack from home they can eat while they are out. * Inspect All Candy and Treats
October 22, 2002
The first international lung cancer conference to be held in China will take researchers to Beijing October 27-30. UCSF, in collaboration with the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, is sponsoring the event. UCSF researchers will be presenting their work on targeted therapies, genomics and other leading-edge science. The conference is designed to educate the medical community both in China and worldwide on the latest available therapies for patients with lung cancer.
October 20, 2002
UCSF-led researchers have developed a highly sensitive, automated test for detecting prions (PREE-on) that they report significantly improves the accuracy and speed of detecting the various forms of the infectious agent, which causes a set of neurodegenerative diseases, in cattle, sheep, deer and elk. Because the test is automated, the researchers say, it could be used for high-throughput testing of brain samples of cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or “mad cow” disease, as well as deer and elk with chronic wasting disease (CWD).
October 17, 2002
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has awarded $4.5 million to UCSF’s Institute for Global Health, in partnership with UCSF’s AIDS Research Institute, to create the Center for International AIDS Support, Training, and Evaluation (CIASTE).  The partnership also will include the University of Washington’s Center for AIDS and STDs through its International Training and Education Center on HIV.
October 17, 2002
Valencia Health Services, a nurse practitioner-run clinic located in San Francisco’s Mission district, has received a $2, 091,007 grant from the United States Department of Health and Human Services to expand primary health care to a diverse population of underserved families and children.
October 15, 2002
Of cancers detected by screening mammography, approximately 20 percent are ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a non-invasive tumor contained within the walls of the breast duct, according to a multi-state study led by UCSF researchers. The researchers found that the likelihood of DCIS diagnosis increases with age and, overall, one in every 1300 screening mammograms results in a diagnosis of DCIS.
October 14, 2002
Tissue cells that are destined to become fat cells can be converted to true bone cells in response to signals sent from outside the cell, according to a study at the University of California, San Francisco.
October 14, 2002
Both drugs and psychological intervention alone or together can help smokers stay away from cigarettes for the short term but not long term, according to a study on smoking cessation at the University of California, San Francisco. This was the first smoking cessation study that compared nortriptyline, a drug used to treat depression, and a drug that has FDA approval for smoking cessation treatment—- sustained release bupropion—-as well as psychological intervention.
October 14, 2002
A newly recommended treatment for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection can cause liver injury, and therefore needs to be used with great caution and frequent monitoring, according to a UCSF-led, multi-center study. The research reporting the increased liver injury from the drugs, rifampin and pyrazinamide, was conducted by investigators at UCSF, Boston University, and Emory University and appears in the October 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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