Latest News

March 20, 2014
Researchers are recording brain activity in visually stunning ways that could lead to targeted therapies for Alzheimer’s, autism and other diseases.
March 05, 2014
UCSF neuroscientist Adam Gazzaley, MD, PhD, is hoping to paint a fuller picture of what is happening in the minds and bodies of those suffering from brain disease with his new lab, Neuroscape, which bridges the worlds of neuroscience and high-tech.
July 09, 2013
Sensory processing disorders are more prevalent in children than autism. In a groundbreaking new study, UCSF researchers have for the first time shown a biological basis for the disease in the brain structure.
February 28, 2013
Researchers have mapped the three-dimensional global connections within the brains of seven adults, which reveal new details about the condition known as agenesis of the corpus callosum, one of the top genetic causes of autism.
December 18, 2012
Hospital MRIs may be better at predicting long-term outcomes for people with mild traumatic brain injuries than CT scans, according to a clinical trial led by researchers at UCSF and the San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center.
June 12, 2012
Rebecca Smith-Bindman, MD, a professor of radiology and biomedical imaging at UCSF, answered these questions in light of a new study that shows that medical imaging is increasing even in health maintenance organization systems (HMOs), which don’t have a financial incentive to conduct them.
June 12, 2012
A study led by researchers at UCSF and Group Health Research Institute, shows that medical imaging is increasing even in health maintenance organization systems (HMOs), which don’t have a financial incentive to conduct them.
February 28, 2012
People with schizophrenia who completed 80 hours of intensive, computerized cognitive training exercises were better able to perform complex tasks that required them to distinguish their internal thoughts from reality.
October 06, 2011
How people walk, jump and run and how their knees look in an MRI scanner may hold the secret to predicting years or even decades in advance whether they will develop osteoarthritis, the common degenerative joint disease that strikes half of all Americans by the time they reach the age of 70.