Latest News

July 01, 2014
Use of catheter ablation is not only beneficial for treating atrial flutter but also can significantly reduce hospital visits – both inpatient and emergency – and lower the risk for atrial fibrillation, according to research by UC San Francisco.
June 05, 2014
The calorie-burning triggered by cold temperatures can be achieved biochemically – without the chill – raising hopes for a weight-loss strategy focused on the immune system rather than the brain, according to a new UCSF study.
May 18, 2014
Researchers from UCSF played major roles in five significant multicenter studies of lung disease published in The New England Journal of Medicine.
May 13, 2014
UCSF scientists have found that industry claims about e-cigarettes are unsupported by the evidence to date, including claims that they help smokers quit.
April 29, 2014
New research out of UCSF is the first to demonstrate that highly stressed people who eat a lot of high-fat, high-sugar food are more prone to health risks than low-stress people who eat the same amount.
March 31, 2014
Young adults with such cardiac risk factors as high blood pressure and elevated glucose levels have significantly worse cognitive function in middle age, according to a new study by dementia researchers at UCSF.
March 12, 2014
It doesn’t always make sense to do a heart scan to measure how much plaque has built up in a patient’s coronary arteries before prescribing statins, UCSF research shows.
February 20, 2014
Scientists at the UCSF-affiliated Gladstone Institutes have devised a new method that allows for the more efficient and complete reprogramming of skin cells into cells that are virtually indistinguishable from heart muscle cells.
February 19, 2014
Genetic testing can help doctors choose the most effective and economical drugs to prevent blood clots in the half a million patients in the U.S. who receive coronary stents each year, according to a new study led by a UCSF researcher.
December 16, 2013
Taxing sugar-sweetened beverages is likely to decrease consumption, resulting in lower rates of diabetes and heart disease, and these health benefits are expected to be greatest for the low-income, Hispanic and African-American Californians who are at highest risk of diabetes, according to a new analysis led by researchers at UC San Francisco.

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