Latest News

September 07, 2007
* WHAT:
September 07, 2007
The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) has just issued the first comprehensive update in a decade of clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. The guidelines emphasize the importance of asthma control and introduce new approaches for monitoring asthma. Updated recommendations for managing asthma include an expanded section on childhood asthma (with an additional age group), new guidance on medications, new recommendations on patient education in settings beyond the physician's office, and new advice for controlling
September 07, 2007
UCSF will host a pediatric research web conference focusing on the "Challenges Facing Institutional Review Boards" on September 11.
September 06, 2007
Scientists at UCSF, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and colleagues have identified a critical gene that increases a person's risk for rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus - both potentially debilitating diseases. The gene may be involved in other autoimmune diseases as well, the researchers say.
September 06, 2007
The deadline to apply for the next round of mediation training offered by the UCSF Work~Life Resource Center is September 21.
September 06, 2007
The campus community is invited to bring their families for a fun-filled day at Six Flags Discovery Kingdom on September 22.
September 05, 2007
Scientists are not in the business of making better mousetraps, but they’re serious about making better mice to understand cancer biology. Cancer sleuths are using new ways to genetically engineer mice. They use these new breeds of mice to study the effects of specific genetic alterations within tumor cells. With the new approach, genes that help trigger cancer are engineered into mice so that they can be turned on and off in specific organs at will. The mice offer what some researchers say is the most realistic animal model yet for studying human cancer.
September 05, 2007
"Detailed structural studies have revealed new insights into why the same prion protein can have different properties and be either weakly or strongly infectious. The researchers said their observations in prions that infect yeast are likely to hold true for the sorts of prions that infect humans and animals.
September 05, 2007
Scientists are not in the business of making better mousetraps, but they're serious about making better mice to understand cancer biology.

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