Latest News

November 29, 2010
In a new UCSF study of more than 2 million mammogram screenings performed on nearly 700,000 women in the United States, scientists for the first time show a direct link between reduced hormone therapy and declines in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) as well as invasive breast cancer.
November 09, 2010
Smoking in women with breast cancer increases breast cancer deaths and deaths overall, according to preliminary research results presented by UCSF epidemiologist Dejana Braithwaite, PhD, at a meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.
September 24, 2010
Basic physical limitations following breast cancer treatment can have far-reaching consequences that substantially affect how long a patient lives.
September 21, 2010
Cancer and infertility can be a double blow. Many women become infertile following cancer treatment. And because more women are living longer thanks to modern chemotherapy and radiation treatment, more are later discovering that they cannot bear children.
June 07, 2010
Fellows, residents and students from all four professional schools shared their research recently during the First Annual Inter-School Research Festival at UCSF.
June 07, 2010
A single dose of radiation administered during surgery is as effective for patients with early forms of breast cancer as standard radiation therapy that can take as long as six weeks, according to new research findings.
April 28, 2010
For the first time, scientists have discovered a way to predict whether women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) – the most common form of non-invasive breast cancer – are at risk of developing more invasive tumors in later years.
March 18, 2010
Taking an innovative path toward personalized medicine, scientists for the first time will be able to eliminate – at an early point in a clinical trial — experimental drugs that show poor efficacy, dramatically shortening the time it takes to get the right medication to the right patient with breast cancer.
March 17, 2010
Banned chemicals -- present in amounts higher than levels found in recent years in US adults -- are turning up in the blood of young girls being studied in California and Ohio. Robert Hiatt
March 16, 2010
UCSF researchers have discovered that a key cellular defect that disturbs the production of proteins in human cells can lead to cancer susceptibility. The scientists also found that a new generation of inhibitory drugs offers promise in correcting this defect.

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