Latest News

February 24, 2005
Fewer parents today talk to their teenagers about drugs than in previous years, finds a new study. In 2004, some 12% of US parents never talked to their teens about drugs, double the percentage in 1998, according to a survey by Partnership for a Drug-Free America. Some suggest the drug experiences of the parents, who were teens in the late 1970s, make them less likely to see risk for their children. But experts warn that today's drugs can be stronger than those used decades ago.
February 23, 2005
Migraine sufferers are more likely to have risk factors for heart disease than those who don't get the headaches, according to a NIH study. Researchers compared 620 migraine patients with 5,135 control subjects and found that those who experienced migraine with aura were more likely to have unfavorable cholesterol profiles, elevated blood pressure and a history of early onset heart disease or stroke. Migraine patients were also more likely to be smokers, but less likely to be alcohol drinkers. The study is reported in the journal Neurology.
February 22, 2005
Getting fired or laid off not only hurts financial health. A CDC study of 35,000 women found that those who were involuntarily unemployed are more likely to have heart disease than are employed women and those who choose to stay at home. For example, 28% of unemployed women reported high blood pressure in comparison to 19% of employed women. Likewise, 6% of unemployed women said they had experienced a previous heart attack, chest pain, or stroke, compared with only 2% of employed women.
February 22, 2005
A new, permanent museum-quality exhibit has been entertaining and educating passersby at UCSF Mount Zion for the past month.
February 18, 2005
The J. David Gladstone Institutes is among the top 15 institutional work environments for life sciences postdoctoral fellows, according to The Scientist's annual "Best Places to Work for Postdocs" survey.
February 18, 2005
Married women who avoid conflict with their spouses have an increased risk of dying from any cause, according to a new study. Researchers studied 1,769 men and 1,913 women, aged 18 to 77, and found that wives who usually or always keep quiet during conflict were four times more likely to die during the follow-up of 10 years. Men whose wives came home upset about work were more than twice as likely to develop heart disease. The study was reported at the Second International Conference on Women, Heart Disease and Stroke in Orlando.
February 17, 2005
A UCSF-led study has found that a novel immunologic therapy increases survival by nearly 18 percent in men with advanced prostate cancer that no longer responds to hormone therapy.
February 17, 2005
Coffee may help prevent a common type of liver cancer, suggests a Japanese study. Researchers studied 90,000 people and found that those who drank coffee daily or nearly every day had half the risk of liver cancer than those who never drank coffee. The protective effect occurred in people who drank one to two cups a day and increased at three to four cups. They were unable to compare the effect of regular and decaffeinated coffee, however, because decaf is rarely consumed in Japan. The study appears in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
February 16, 2005
UCSF is again participating in a program designed to help people earning under $36,000 with tax preparation and securing tax refunds. A workshop will be held on Tuesday, March 1, noon to 1 p.m.
February 16, 2005
A Columbia University study of 60 newborns in New York City reveals that exposure of expectant mothers to combustion related urban air pollution may damage babies' chromosomes while in the womb. The air pollutants included emissions from cars, trucks, bus engines, residential heating, power generation and tobacco smoking. Exposure to pollutants was assessed through questionnaires and portable air monitors worn by the mothers during the third trimester of their pregnancies, and chromosomal abnormalities were measured in umbilical cord blood.

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