Latest News

February 15, 2005
A technique for detecting prions in tissue, developed by UCSF scientists, is significantly more sensitive than the diagnostic procedures now used to detect the lethal particles in brain tissue, finds a new study.
February 15, 2005
School-based sex education and preventing social aggression in girls are only two of the topics that will be discussed when the UCSF National Center of Excellence in Women's Health co-hosts a symposium on Saturday, Feb. 26, at UCSF Mount Zion Medical Center.
February 15, 2005
UCSF Chancellor J. Michael Bishop, MD, was named by President George W. Bush as a recipient of the nation's highest honor for science and technology.
February 15, 2005
Premenstrual syndrome can increase costs for employers, according to a study from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Researchers assessed PMS symptoms of 374 women, 18 to 45, and found that 30% had PMS and those women had an average 14% reduction in expected work hours per week and a 15% reduction in work productivity. Overall, total indirect employer costs for women with PMS were about $4,333 more per year, found the study.
February 14, 2005
Carroll Estes, founding director of UCSF's Institute for Health and Aging, says privatizing Social Security could have dire consequences. She'll present compelling information on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 7 to 8:45 p.m. on the Parnassus campus.
February 14, 2005
Many people with severe, disabling illnesses are just as happy as healthy people, finds a University of Michigan study. Researchers studied and compared the moods of 49 kidney failure patients receiving dialysis with a like number of healthy people. They found that the patients were in good moods the vast majority of time - no different than their healthy counterparts - and showed remarkable resilience of spirit. The study appeared in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.
February 14, 2005
Faculty, staff and students who want to voice their opinions on how the UCSF Parnassus Heights campus evolves in design and function in the future are encouraged to fill out an online survey.
February 11, 2005
The J. David Gladstone Institutes has selected award-winning scientist Elizabeth H. Blackburn, PhD, an expert on the role that telomeres has on aging and carcinogenesis, as this year's distinguished lecturer.
February 11, 2005
The sudden death of a loved one really can cause a broken heart, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University. They found in 19 patients between 1999 and 2003 that a tragic or shocking event can stun the heart and produce classic heart attack-like symptoms, including chest pain, shortness of breath and fluid in the lungs. Unlike a heart attack, the condition is reversible. They dubbed the condition "broken heart syndrome." Their report appears in the New England Journal of Medicine.
February 10, 2005
Preventing gum disease could reduce the risk of stroke and heart attack, according to a Columbia University study. Researchers studied 657 people who had no history of stroke or heart attack and found that those with more bacteria that cause periodontal disease also had thicker carotid arteries -- a strong indicator of clogged blood vessels. The study appeared in the journal Circulation.

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