Latest News

November 08, 2012
A 20-year study following 110,645 workers who helped clean up after the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident shows that the workers share a significant increased risk of developing leukemia.
November 01, 2012
A new molecular test developed by doctors at UCSF may give doctors the ability to better predict post-operative early-stage lung cancer mortality.
September 28, 2012
September is National Childhood Cancer Awareness month, encouraging awareness and affirmation to the commitment of fighting pediatric cancer.
September 18, 2012
A once-promising discovery linking prostate cancer to an obscure retrovirus derived from mice was the result of an inadvertent laboratory contamination, a forensic analysis of tissue samples and lab experiments – some dating back nearly a decade – has confirmed.
September 13, 2012
Biomedical researchers at UCSF have won five of 51 prestigious National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator awards for high-risk, high-reward research, each receiving up to $1.5 million over five years.
August 21, 2012
A proposed new treatment to help HIV/AIDS patients suffering from Kaposi’s sarcoma, the most common form of cancer in people with HIV, is now one step closer to becoming a reality thanks to a program that supports promising early-stage research.
August 08, 2012
Preliminary results of a recent study by Christina Baggott, a trained oncology nurse, found that children with cancer were significantly more likely to weigh in on their symptoms when using a kid-friendly touch-screen computer assessment tool, than the standard written checklist.
August 07, 2012
Marin County, Calif., has one of the highest rates of breast cancer in the world, a fact that scientists know has nothing to do with the land itself but with some other, unknown factor.
July 24, 2012
A UCSF team has harnessed a natural protein in bacteria to create a “pause switch” in immune cells, potentially leading to more effective and safer immune therapies for diseases such as cancer and multiple sclerosis.
July 16, 2012
UCSF researchers triggered cellular transformation — and caused tumors to form in mice — by activating just two genes, a discovery that suggests drugs that are able to target those genes may provide a way to treat the deadly cancer, known as cholangiocarcinoma.

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