Latest News

February 01, 2012
Sugar should be controlled like alcohol and tobacco to protect public health, according to a team of UCSF researchers, who maintain in a new report that sugar is fueling a global obesity pandemic, contributing to 35 million deaths annually worldwide.
December 08, 2011
Adolescents hospitalized with anorexia nervosa who receive treatment based on current recommendations for refeeding fail to gain significant weight during their first week in the hospital, according to a new study by UCSF researchers.
December 07, 2011
In a study published online in the Journal of Obesity, mastering simple mindful eating and stress-reduction techniques helped prevent weight gain without dieting.
November 10, 2011
Microbes that dwell within us can help or harm us, according to UCSF experts at "Gut Check," a lunchtime panel discussion hosted by UCSF as part of the Bay Area Science Festival last week.
October 25, 2011
New studies of vitamin supplements, prostate cancer risk in men and mortality in women have yielded disappointing results. Some researchers remain optimistic about identifying dietary and lifestyle interventions that are beneficial to health.
March 23, 2011
Researchers exploring human metabolism at UCSF have uncovered a handful of chemical compounds that regulate fat storage in worms, offering a new tool for understanding obesity and finding future treatments for diseases associated with obesity.
March 01, 2011
Scientists at the UCSF Cardiovascular Research Institute have discovered how a change in growth hormone activity in mice leads to fatty liver disease, a condition whose human counterpart is of rising concern worldwide.
February 03, 2011
UCSF Nobel laureate Elizabeth Blackburn is not ready to predict how long you will live. But she and her UCSF colleagues are exploring a feature within cells that is a kind of hourglass for aging.
December 20, 2010
’Tis the season for temptations, with holiday dinners and treats nearly everywhere we turn. So stick a fork into these 10 tips from the UCSF Center for Prevention of Heart and Vascular Disease.
December 16, 2010
Cystatin C, a blood marker of kidney function, proved significantly more accurate than the standard blood marker, creatinine, in predicting serious complications of kidney disease, in a study by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and UCSF.

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