Latest News

January 24, 2014
UCSF researchers have shown that, in mice at least, pregnancy complications after fetal surgery are triggered by activation of the mother’s T cells.
January 21, 2014
Someone with access to firearms is three times more likely to commit suicide and nearly twice as likely to be the victim of a homicide as someone who does not have access, according to a UCSF analysis.
January 15, 2014
Women giving birth in California can face a huge cost difference in their hospital bills, according to a new UCSF study that highlights the need for more price transparency in health care.
October 09, 2013
Childbirth is not a major contributor to sexual dysfunction in women later in life, according to a new study led by UCSF researchers.
June 05, 2013
A new UCSF study finds that poor sleep – particularly waking too early – appears to play a significant role in raising unhealthy levels of inflammation among women with coronary heart disease.
May 13, 2013
Researchers at UC San Francisco have found that giving small amounts of formula in the first few days of life to infants experiencing high levels of early weight loss actually can increase the length of time their mothers end up breastfeeding.
April 16, 2013
A new UCSF study has found a clear association between certain genes and the development of lymphedema, a painful and chronic condition that often occurs after breast cancer surgery and some other cancer treatments.
March 18, 2013
Screening for breast cancer every two years appears just as beneficial as yearly mammograms for women ages 50 to 74, with significantly fewer “false positives” – even for women whose breasts are dense or who use hormone therapy for menopause.
February 11, 2013
Parents are more accepting of their teenage daughters using birth control pills than any other form of contraception, including condoms, according to a recent study from UCSF.
February 05, 2013
Among older women, getting a mammogram every two years was just as beneficial as getting a mammogram annually, and led to significantly fewer false positive results, according to a study led by UCSF.

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