Latest News

June 04, 2013
Investigators at Duke Medicine and UCSF have been selected to oversee a nationwide research program on antibacterial resistance, which will focus on the growing unmet challenges associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli.
May 16, 2013
Raising hopes for cell-based therapies, UCSF researchers have created the first functioning human thymus tissue from embryonic stem cells in the laboratory.
March 13, 2013
The immune system’s T cells, while coordinating responses to diseases and vaccines, act like honey bees sharing information about the best honey sources, according to a new study by scientists at UCSF.
November 19, 2012
DNA sequences obtained from a handful of patients with multiple sclerosis at the UCSF Medical Center have revealed the existence of an “immune exchange” that allows the disease-causing cells to move in and out of the brain.
November 05, 2012
Most young scientists fresh out of graduate school are content to begin a post-doctoral fellowship, working for an established faculty member. But for Christopher Allen, PhD, award-winning research in asthma meant the fast-track onto UCSF’s faculty.
August 29, 2012
Through the Immunological Immune Project, leading university immunologists and bioinformatics experts are probing genes to better understand how immune responses are coordinated. They aim to identify new ways to manipulate the immune system to better fight disease.
June 13, 2012
Scientists at the UCSF-affiliated Gladstone Institutes participated in the national Human Microbiome Project, which used groundbreaking methods to vastly improve the understanding of bacteria that reside in and on the human body.
May 30, 2012
After being infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in a laboratory study, rhesus macaques that had more of a certain type of immune cell in their gut than others had much lower levels of the virus in their blood, and for six months after infection were better able to control the virus.
May 02, 2012
A pioneering approach to imaging breast cancer in mice has revealed new clues about why the human immune system often fails to attack tumors and keep cancer in check. This observation, by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), may help to reveal new approaches to cancer immunotherapy.
March 05, 2012
Feng-Yen Li, a PhD candidate in biomedical sciences at UCSF, is among 13 graduate students from throughout North America chosen to receive the 2012 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award.

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