Latest News

October 25, 2011
New studies of vitamin supplements, prostate cancer risk in men and mortality in women have yielded disappointing results. Some researchers remain optimistic about identifying dietary and lifestyle interventions that are beneficial to health.
March 01, 2011
Scientists at the UCSF Cardiovascular Research Institute have discovered how a change in growth hormone activity in mice leads to fatty liver disease, a condition whose human counterpart is of rising concern worldwide.
December 20, 2010
’Tis the season for temptations, with holiday dinners and treats nearly everywhere we turn. So stick a fork into these 10 tips from the UCSF Center for Prevention of Heart and Vascular Disease.
December 09, 2010
During December and throughout 2011, members of the UCSF community can participate in events and activities that can improve their health and well being.
November 15, 2010
Cutting back on salt in teenagers’ diets by as little as one-half teaspoon, or three grams, a day, could reduce the number of young adults with high blood pressure by 44 to 63 percent, according to new research presented Sunday, Nov. 14 at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2010 meeting in Chicago.
November 10, 2010
Soft drink companies are well-positioned to help combat child malnutrition in developing countries because of their expanding business and extensive distribution routes.
October 05, 2010
A diet supplemented with powdered dried plum restored bone lost by mice during the course of normal aging, in a study led by Bernard P. Halloran, PhD, at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.
September 01, 2010
Ezlopitant, a compound known to suppress craving for alcohol in humans, was shown to decrease consumption of sweetened water by rodents in a study by researchers at the Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center, which is affiliated with UCSF.
August 16, 2010
Obesity rates have started to decline and level off for many adolescents, but continue to increase for certain racial and ethnic minorities, according to a new UCSF-led study.
August 02, 2010
Young people with even modestly elevated cholesterol levels are more likely to develop coronary artery calcium and atherosclerosis later in life, according to a study by UCSF researchers.

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