Latest News

May 29, 2014
From prostate cancer to immunotherapy to genetic testing, UCSF research is providing new insights and aiding in the development of new treatment strategies for cancer.
March 17, 2014
One of the world’s preeminent cancer scientists, Alan Ashworth, PhD, FRS, has been appointed the new director of the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.
December 05, 2013
UCSF has been awarded a major federal grant to “transform and revolutionize” the treatment of prostate cancer, the second most common form of cancer among American men.
September 16, 2013
A small pilot study shows for the first time that changes in diet, exercise, stress management and social support may result in longer telomeres, the parts of chromosomes that affect aging.
August 19, 2013
A natural form of sugar could offer a noninvasive way to precisely image tumors and determine whether cancer medication is effective using new technology developed at UCSF in collaboration with GE Healthcare.
June 10, 2013
Men with prostate cancer may significantly improve their survival chances with a simple change in their diet, a new UCSF-led study has found.
May 08, 2013
A new genomic test can help predict whether men are more likely to harbor an aggressive form of prostate cancer, according to a new UCSF study.
October 09, 2012
Armed with a new $10 million grant, a multi-center “dream team’’ of scientists, led by UCSF, is embarking on a groundbreaking undertaking to overcome therapeutic resistance and revolutionize treatment for patients with advanced prostate cancer.
September 18, 2012
A once-promising discovery linking prostate cancer to an obscure retrovirus derived from mice was the result of an inadvertent laboratory contamination, a forensic analysis of tissue samples and lab experiments – some dating back nearly a decade – has confirmed.
June 04, 2012
A new medication proved effective in slowing the spread of metastatic prostate cancer, while helping to maintain the quality of life, in patients with advanced disease, according to results of a UCSF-led study.

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