Latest News

November 06, 2012
Laws that end smoking at work and other public places result in significantly fewer hospitalizations for heart attacks, strokes, asthma and other respiratory conditions, a new UCSF analysis has found.
September 27, 2012
Top box office films last year showed more onscreen smoking than the prior year, reversing five years of steady progress in reducing tobacco imagery in movies, according to a new UCSF study.
September 20, 2012
Secondhand smoke is accountable for 42,000 deaths annually to nonsmokers in the United States, including nearly 900 infants, according to a new UCSF study.
July 27, 2012
Suzanne Harris was a registered nurse, worked on a cancer unit and was a mother to a young child when she smoked. Today, she directs the UCSF Fontana Tobacco Treatment Center, which offers comprehensive smoking cessation classes and relapse prevention support.
July 27, 2012
The brains of adolescents who smoke as little as two cigarettes a day respond to images of smoking as do the brains of heavily addicted adult smokers: with pleasure.
July 02, 2012
Smokers can begin loosening the tight grip of nicotine addiction by smoking low-nicotine cigarettes, without lighting up any more than they usually do, according to recent research led by long-time UCSF nicotine researcher Neal Benowitz, MD. 
May 31, 2012
African-American and Latino children whose mothers smoked during pregnancy are more likely to suffer from acute asthma symptoms in their teens than asthma sufferers whose mothers did not smoke, according to a new study led by a research team at UCSF.
May 31, 2012
On June 5, California voters will decide whether the state should impose a $1 per pack tax on cigarettes, as well as a corresponding tax increase on other tobacco products.
May 25, 2012
The UCSF community is invited to participate in World No Tobacco Day on May 31.
May 03, 2012
A popular smoking cessation medication has been under a cloud of suspicion ever since the Canadian Medical Association Journal published a study in July 2011 reporting “risk of serious adverse cardiovascular events associated with varenicline.” UCSF researchers, however, question the way the previous study was conducted, and their new analysis, scheduled to be published May 4 in BMJ, reaches a very different conclusion.

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