Latest News

July 14, 2010
A commercial brain fitness program has been shown to improve memory in older adults, at least in the period soon after training. The findings are the first to show that practicing simple visual tasks can improve the accuracy of short-term, or “working” visual memory.
July 14, 2010
UCSF is accepting applications up to August 1 for the kick-off of a new Doctoral Program in Epidemiology and Translational Science this fall.
July 13, 2010
The heavy burden of hunger in the United States helps explain why the poor are at higher risk for obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes, according to an editorial in the July 1 New England Journal of Medicine co-authored by two UCSF faculty members.
July 13, 2010
Early tobacco industry funding of the Framingham Heart Study delayed findings that eventually identified smoking as a major risk factor for heart disease, according to a UCSF analysis.
July 12, 2010
A new study shows that overweight and obese women who suffer from hot flashes can reduce the severity of their hot flashes if they lose weight through diet or exercise.
July 12, 2010
A recent book by UCSF sociologist Patrick Fox, PhD, helps us understand a patient’s perspective in Alzheimer’s disease.
July 07, 2010
Heart disease patients with anxiety disorder were significantly more likely to experience stroke, heart failure, heart attack, transient ischemic attack (mini-stroke), or death than heart disease patients without anxiety, in a study led by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.
July 07, 2010
Americans with lung disease may face a far greater level of lung damage than either they or their doctor suspect, depending on their individual genetic heritage, according to a study released July 7. The research implications range from diagnosing the severity of asthma to disability decisions or eligibility for lung transplants, researchers say.
July 07, 2010
Gail Martin, whose first-in-field discoveries are well known by developmental biologists around the world, has been named to receive the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology 2011 Excellence in Science Award.
July 06, 2010
A new study by UCSF cardiologists and researchers found that high concentrations of cocoa flavanols decrease blood pressure, improve the health of blood vessels and increase the number of circulating angiogenic cells in patients with heart disease. The findings indicate that foods rich in flavanols – such as cocoa products, tea, wine, and various fruits and vegetables – have a cardio-protective benefit for heart disease patients.

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