Latest News

September 19, 2014
More than a hundred colleagues, family and friends gathered Monday to celebrate Peter Walter, PhD, the recipient of the 2014 Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, one of the most prestigious honors in science and medicine.
September 11, 2014
Bacteria that normally live in and upon us have genetic blueprints that enable them to make thousands of molecules that act like drugs, and some of these molecules might serve as the basis for new human therapeutics, according to UCSF researchers.
September 08, 2014
Peter Walter, PhD, professor of biochemistry and biophysics at UCSF, has received the 2014 Lasker Basic Medical Research Award.
September 08, 2014
Peter Walter has won the 2014 Lasker Award, popularly known as the "American Nobels." It’s the second major accolade this year alone for the Germany native, whose career didn't always point toward being a research scientist.
August 07, 2014
New research partly led by UCSF-affiliated scientists suggests that one in 10 cancer patients would be more accurately diagnosed if their tumors were defined by cellular and molecular criteria rather than by the tissues in which they originated.
July 29, 2014
A new study is the first to show that while the impact of life’s stressors accumulate over time and accelerate cellular aging, these negative effects may be reduced by maintaining a healthy diet, exercising and sleeping well.
July 24, 2014
Researchers at UCSF have discovered that endostatin, a protein that once aroused intense interest as a possible cancer treatment, plays a key role in the stable functioning of the nervous system.
July 10, 2014
Watch five esteemed faculty members give TED-like talks, called Discovery Talks, on a specific aspect of their research at UCSF Alumni Weekend 2014.
July 10, 2014
In a new study led by UCSF scientists, a chemical compound designed to precisely target part of a crucial cellular quality-control network provided significant protection, in rats and mice, against degenerative forms of blindness and diabetes.
June 25, 2014
UCSF scientists have shown that cancer-induced structural changes in a sugary coating ensheathing cells can promote mechanical interactions that fuel tumor growth and metastasis.

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