Latest News

November 14, 2012
Personalized medicine advances arising from genetic discoveries were the primary focus of wide-ranging presentations at the UCSF Institute for Human Genetics 2012 Symposium on Nov. 5.
November 05, 2012
As Californians prepare to vote on Proposition 37, which would require labeling of food that’s been genetically modified, debate continues on the health implications of eating such foods.
October 29, 2012
Scientists at the UCSF-affiliated Gladstone Institutes and the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered how modifying a gene halts the toxic buildup of a protein found in nerve cells. These findings point to a potential new tactic for treating a variety of neurodegenerative conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease).
August 29, 2012
Through the Immunological Immune Project, leading university immunologists and bioinformatics experts are probing genes to better understand how immune responses are coordinated. They aim to identify new ways to manipulate the immune system to better fight disease.
August 07, 2012
Marin County, Calif., has one of the highest rates of breast cancer in the world, a fact that scientists know has nothing to do with the land itself but with some other, unknown factor.
July 24, 2012
When Ramon Birnbaum, PhD, came to UCSF three years ago to do his postdoctoral work on the role of genetic regulation in human disease in the lab of School of Pharmacy faculty member Nadav Ahituv, PhD, epilepsy was barely on his radar.
May 01, 2012
UCSF neurologist Louis Ptacek, MD, has been elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), for his research on the biology and genetics of several human diseases and disorders -- from epilepsy and migraine to sleep disorders and jet lag.
April 13, 2012
One of the ultimate ways of understanding what impact any particular gene has in human health or disease is to disrupt it—knocking it down or wiping it out in a worm, fly or mouse and gauging what happens next.
February 02, 2012
Hormones shape our bodies, make us fertile, excite our most basic urges, and as scientists have known for years, they govern the behaviors that separate men from women. But how?
December 13, 2011
A cure for sickle cell anemia and other life-threatening genetic disorders that arise in the blood is the goal of a new $6.7-million, five-year research project headed by UCSF scientist Y. W. Kan, a pioneer of modern genetics and the diagnosis of genetic diseases before birth.

Pages