Latest News

September 17, 2014
To diagnose painful kidney stones in hospital emergency rooms, CT scans are no better than less-often-used ultrasound exams, according to a clinical study conducted at 15 medical centers.
July 10, 2014
Watch five esteemed faculty members give TED-like talks, called Discovery Talks, on a specific aspect of their research at UCSF Alumni Weekend 2014.
April 25, 2014
A lecture about Magnetic Resonance Imaging and its new applications will occur on May 1. William G. Bradley, Jr., MD, PhD, professor and chair of UC San Diego’s Department of Radiology and an alumnus of UCSF, will return to campus as the 2014 Margulis Alumnus Lecturer.
October 14, 2013
Teams of scientists at UCSF are collaborating to build upon existing imaging techniques and find new ways to monitor diseases using creative applications of emerging technologies.
July 09, 2013
Sensory processing disorders are more prevalent in children than autism. In a groundbreaking new study, UCSF researchers have for the first time shown a biological basis for the disease in the brain structure.
December 18, 2012
Hospital MRIs may be better at predicting long-term outcomes for people with mild traumatic brain injuries than CT scans, according to a clinical trial led by researchers at UCSF and the San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center.
November 27, 2012
Very high and very low levels of physical activity can both accelerate the degeneration of knee cartilage in middle-aged adults, according to a new study by UCSF researchers.
November 08, 2012
A 20-year study following 110,645 workers who helped clean up after the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident shows that the workers share a significant increased risk of developing leukemia.
September 21, 2012
The American Heart Association will recognize Charles Higgins, MD, FAHA, professor of radiology at UCSF Medical Center, as one of six Distinguished Scientists at scientific sessions in November 2012.
June 14, 2012
Computed tomographic colonography (CTC), also known as virtual colonoscopy, administered without laxatives is as accurate as conventional colonoscopy in detecting clinically significant, potentially cancerous polyps, according to a study performed jointly at the San Francisco VA Medical Center, UCSF and Massachusetts General Hospital.

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