Campus News

April 18, 2012
Scientists at the UCSF-affiliated Gladstone Institutes announced a research breakthrough in mice that one day may help doctors restore hearts damaged by heart attacks — by converting scar-forming cardiac cells into beating heart muscle.
May 06, 2011
Three UCSF scientists have received grants from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to advance their investigations of treatment strategies for degenerative muscle diseases, such as muscular dystrophy, and heart disease, and to determine why human embryonic stem cells are susceptible to forming tumors.
February 09, 2011
UCSF celebrates the opening of an architecturally unique stem cell building, a milestone in the history of UCSF’s pioneering stem cell research program, one of the largest and most comprehensive of its kind in the United States.
January 31, 2011
Ray and Dagmar Dolby this week donated $20 million to the University of California, San Francisco to provide funding for a stem cell building on the Parnassus campus.
January 18, 2011
UCSF researchers have tackled a decade-long scientific conundrum, and their discovery is expected to lead to significant advances in using stem cells to treat genetic diseases before birth.
December 16, 2010
UCSF researchers have shown for the first time that the human fetal immune system arises from an entirely different source than the adult immune system, and is more likely to tolerate than fight foreign substances in its environment.
December 14, 2010
For patients with glioma, the most common primary brain tumor, new findings may explain why current therapies fail to eradicate the cancer. A UCSF-led team of scientists has identified for the first time that progenitor rather than neural stem cells underly a type of glioma called oligodendroglioma.
November 17, 2010
Scientists are reporting the first direct evidence that a subtle change in the physical properties of a tissue can affect its function.
October 22, 2010
UCSF scientists have received two grants from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to refine their human embryonic stem cell-based strategies for treating neurological diseases and liver failure.
September 24, 2010
The U.S. Department of Justice declined to consent to the University of California’s motion to intervene in Sherley v. Sebelius, the case regarding federal funding for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, on which UC had made a motion to the U.S. Federal Court of Appeals on Sept. 20.

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