Campus News

November 19, 2012
Women exposed to trauma may be at greater risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder because of a heightened fear response, according to a new study.
January 18, 2012
Dogs with spinal cord injuries may soon benefit from an experimental drug being tested by researchers at UCSF and Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences — work that they hope will one day help people with similar injuries.
September 13, 2011
On the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11,  faculty members reflect on the psychological toll the tragedy took. 
April 26, 2011
Men and women had starkly different immune system responses to chronic post-traumatic stress disorder, with men showing no response and women showing a strong response, in two studies by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco.
January 12, 2011
In a study led by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco, a new cognitive training method significantly improved the ability of patients with chronic brain injury to maintain attention on goals and execute tasks – skills that these patients often lack as a result of their injuries.
August 30, 2010
UCSF researchers at the San VA Medical Center have been working with US Air Force officers to develop and field test Deployment Anxiety Reduction Training with the goal of stopping post-traumatic stress disorder before it starts.
June 17, 2010
The Veterans Health Research Institute or NCIRE will present “The Brain at War: Neurocognitive Consequences of Combat” today (June 17).
April 09, 2010
A new report by the Institute of Medicine has found that military service in the Persian Gulf War is a cause of post-traumatic stress disorder in some veterans.
March 01, 2010
A specific region of the hippocampus, a brain structure that is essential to memory, is significantly smaller in veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder than in those without the condition, according to a study by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and UCSF.
February 10, 2010
Among soldiers who served in Iraq, the act of taking a life in combat was a significant predictor of post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol abuse, hostility and anger, and relationship problems, according to a study led by a psychologist at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.

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