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UCSF Salutes Three for Commitment to Advancing Diversity

January 21, 2011 The UCSF community recognized the stellar efforts of a student as well as faculty and staff members at the annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards on Jan. 25.

UCSF tests promising solutions for cancer hair loss

December 13, 2010 UCSF physicians are combating a devastating side effect of chemotherapy with an innovative new program -- “Hair to Stay” -- to evaluate devices that could reduce scalp hair loss in breast cancer patients.

Smoking Is Associated with More Deaths among Women with Breast Cancer

November 09, 2010 Smoking in women with breast cancer increases breast cancer deaths and deaths overall, according to preliminary research results presented by UCSF epidemiologist Dejana Braithwaite, PhD, at a meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Physical limitations take a significant toll in breast cancer survivors

September 24, 2010 Basic physical limitations following breast cancer treatment can have far-reaching consequences that substantially affect how long a patient lives.

Preserving Fertility of Women with Cancer Is Often Neglected

September 21, 2010 Cancer and infertility can be a double blow. Many women become infertile following cancer treatment. And because more women are living longer thanks to modern chemotherapy and radiation treatment, more are later discovering that they cannot bear children.

First Annual Inter-School Research Festival Fosters Multidisciplinary Collaboration

June 07, 2010 Fellows, residents and students from all four professional schools shared their research recently during the First Annual Inter-School Research Festival at UCSF.

One-dose radiation found effective for early breast cancer

June 07, 2010 A single dose of radiation administered during surgery is as effective for patients with early forms of breast cancer as standard radiation therapy that can take as long as six weeks, according to new research findings.

Breakthrough method predicts risk of invasive breast cancer

April 28, 2010 For the first time, scientists have discovered a way to predict whether women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) – the most common form of non-invasive breast cancer – are at risk of developing more invasive tumors in later years.

US Launches Novel Clinical Trial to Rapidly Screen Promising Drugs for Breast Cancer Patients

March 18, 2010 Taking an innovative path toward personalized medicine, scientists for the first time will be able to eliminate – at an early point in a clinical trial — experimental drugs that show poor efficacy, dramatically shortening the time it takes to get the right medication to the right patient with breast cancer.

Flame Retardants, PCBs & Pesticides Found in Blood of Young Girls

March 17, 2010 Banned chemicals -- present in amounts higher than levels found in recent years in US adults -- are turning up in the blood of young girls being studied in California and Ohio. Robert Hiatt

Blocking cancer in its path: New cellular defect discovered

March 16, 2010 UCSF researchers have discovered that a key cellular defect that disturbs the production of proteins in human cells can lead to cancer susceptibility. The scientists also found that a new generation of inhibitory drugs offers promise in correcting this defect.

Breast Cancer Lab Discoveries Quickly Lead to New Clinical Trial

March 03, 2010 New UCSF clinical trial tests intermittent high-dosage treatment for HER2-positive breast cancers.

New cancer-fighting strategy focuses on signaling molecules

February 24, 2010 Cancer researchers studying the immune system have identified a previously unrecognized set of targets and biomarkers to battle solid tumors.

UCSF Chancellor Cites Need for Faster Pipeline of Better, Cheaper Drugs for Cancer Patients

February 03, 2010 UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann outlines a vision for faster development of better, cheaper drugs to fight cancer.

Cognitively impaired elderly women get unneeded screening mammography, study finds

January 14, 2010 A significant percentage of U.S. women 70 years or older who were severely cognitively impaired received screening mammography that was unlikely to benefit them, according to a study of 2,131 elderly women conducted by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco.

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