Campus News

November 15, 2010
Cutting back on salt in teenagers’ diets by as little as one-half teaspoon, or three grams, a day, could reduce the number of young adults with high blood pressure by 44 to 63 percent, according to new research presented Sunday, Nov. 14 at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2010 meeting in Chicago.
November 15, 2010
UCSF researchers have for the first time shown that an external optical pacemaker can be used in a vertebrate to control its heart rate.
November 03, 2010
Paul Simpson, a cardiologist at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and a professor of medicine at UCSF, has been named the 2010 Thomas Smith Memorial Lecturer by the American Heart Association.
September 28, 2010
Surgical patients with known heart disease risks who are given beta blockers around the time of surgery have a significantly reduced risk of post-operative death compared with patients not given beta blockers, according to a study by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.
August 03, 2010
Testosterone in men has become a hot health topic. New studies, including one by UCSF researchers, now are sparking a controversy over the role of testosterone in heart disease.
July 28, 2010
A new analysis led by researchers at UCSF shows that avoiding lowest-volume hospitals and maximizing adherence to quality care processes are both effective approaches to reducing costs associated with coronary bypass surgery.
July 13, 2010
Early tobacco industry funding of the Framingham Heart Study delayed findings that eventually identified smoking as a major risk factor for heart disease, according to a UCSF analysis.
July 07, 2010
Heart disease patients with anxiety disorder were significantly more likely to experience stroke, heart failure, heart attack, transient ischemic attack (mini-stroke), or death than heart disease patients without anxiety, in a study led by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.
July 06, 2010
A new study by UCSF cardiologists and researchers found that high concentrations of cocoa flavanols decrease blood pressure, improve the health of blood vessels and increase the number of circulating angiogenic cells in patients with heart disease. The findings indicate that foods rich in flavanols – such as cocoa products, tea, wine, and various fruits and vegetables – have a cardio-protective benefit for heart disease patients.
July 02, 2010
HIV-infected patients who lost subcutaneous fat as a result of taking first-generation antiretroviral drugs still had strikingly less body fat than non-infected controls five years after switching to newer medications, according to a study led by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco.

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