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UCSF Team Shows How to Make Skinny Worms Fat and Fat Worms Skinny

March 23, 2011 Researchers exploring human metabolism at UCSF have uncovered a handful of chemical compounds that regulate fat storage in worms, offering a new tool for understanding obesity and finding future treatments for diseases associated with obesity.

UCSF Researchers Uncover Hormone Pathway to Fatty Liver Disease

March 01, 2011 Scientists at the UCSF Cardiovascular Research Institute have discovered how a change in growth hormone activity in mice leads to fatty liver disease, a condition whose human counterpart is of rising concern worldwide.

New test can predict complications from kidney disease

December 16, 2010 Cystatin C, a blood marker of kidney function, proved significantly more accurate than the standard blood marker, creatinine, in predicting serious complications of kidney disease, in a study by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and UCSF.

Reducing salt in teen diet could have big impact on future health

November 15, 2010 Cutting back on salt in teenagers’ diets by as little as one-half teaspoon, or three grams, a day, could reduce the number of young adults with high blood pressure by 44 to 63 percent, according to new research presented Sunday, Nov. 14 at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2010 meeting in Chicago.

Soft drink industry should focus on child nutrition in developing world

November 10, 2010 Soft drink companies are well-positioned to help combat child malnutrition in developing countries because of their expanding business and extensive distribution routes.

Dried plum restores bone in aging mice, scientists report

October 05, 2010 A diet supplemented with powdered dried plum restored bone lost by mice during the course of normal aging, in a study led by Bernard P. Halloran, PhD, at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.

Biochemical pathway may link addiction, compulsive eating

September 01, 2010 Ezlopitant, a compound known to suppress craving for alcohol in humans, was shown to decrease consumption of sweetened water by rodents in a study by researchers at the Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center, which is affiliated with UCSF.

Obesity rates decline for many adolescents but disparities worsen

August 16, 2010 Obesity rates have started to decline and level off for many adolescents, but continue to increase for certain racial and ethnic minorities, according to a new UCSF-led study.

Cholesterol levels in young adults predict risk of future heart disease

August 02, 2010 Young people with even modestly elevated cholesterol levels are more likely to develop coronary artery calcium and atherosclerosis later in life, according to a study by UCSF researchers.

NEJM Editorial cites toll of disparity on chronic disease

July 13, 2010 The heavy burden of hunger in the United States helps explain why the poor are at higher risk for obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes, according to an editorial in the July 1 New England Journal of Medicine co-authored by two UCSF faculty members.

Weight loss reduces hot flashes in overweight and obese women

July 12, 2010 A new study shows that overweight and obese women who suffer from hot flashes can reduce the severity of their hot flashes if they lose weight through diet or exercise.

Cocoa flavanols improve vascular and blood pressure measures for coronary artery disease patients

July 06, 2010 A new study by UCSF cardiologists and researchers found that high concentrations of cocoa flavanols decrease blood pressure, improve the health of blood vessels and increase the number of circulating angiogenic cells in patients with heart disease. The findings indicate that foods rich in flavanols – such as cocoa products, tea, wine, and various fruits and vegetables – have a cardio-protective benefit for heart disease patients.

Gestational diabetes linked to serotonin and dietary protein

June 27, 2010 The cause of diabetes during pregnancy is directly controlled by serotonin, a chemical produced by the body and normally known as a neurotransmitter, and is influenced by the amount of protein in the mother’s diet early in pregnancy, according to new findings of an international team led by researchers at UCSF.

Vitamin D: Not just for bones, says San Francisco VA physician

June 11, 2010 It is well-known that vitamin D is essential for strong and healthy bones. However, in an article in the online “In Press” section of “Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism,” a San Francisco VA Medical Center physician reviews recent scientific literature suggesting that the vitamin may also play a role in preventing cancer, fighting infection, and controlling or preventing auto-immune disease.

Childhood obesity interventions must start before birth

April 14, 2010 To be a truly comprehensive and successful anti-obesity program, First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” campaign must include interventions that target pregnant women, infants, and pre-school-age children, UCSF experts say.

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