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UCSF Team Shows How to Make Skinny Worms Fat and Fat Worms Skinny

March 23, 2011 Researchers exploring human metabolism at UCSF have uncovered a handful of chemical compounds that regulate fat storage in worms, offering a new tool for understanding obesity and finding future treatments for diseases associated with obesity.

UCSF Researchers Uncover Hormone Pathway to Fatty Liver Disease

March 01, 2011 Scientists at the UCSF Cardiovascular Research Institute have discovered how a change in growth hormone activity in mice leads to fatty liver disease, a condition whose human counterpart is of rising concern worldwide.

Aging, Chronic Disease and Telomeres Are Linked in Recent Studies

February 03, 2011 UCSF Nobel laureate Elizabeth Blackburn is not ready to predict how long you will live. But she and her UCSF colleagues are exploring a feature within cells that is a kind of hourglass for aging.

New test can predict complications from kidney disease

December 16, 2010 Cystatin C, a blood marker of kidney function, proved significantly more accurate than the standard blood marker, creatinine, in predicting serious complications of kidney disease, in a study by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and UCSF.

Charitable Giving Campaign Nears its Final Days

December 15, 2010 With only days to go for employees to make donations through the UCSF Charitable Giving Campaign, so far fund totals are looking remarkably below those raised in previous years.

Chemicals in Environment Deserve Study for Possible Role in Fat Gain, Says Byers Award Recipient

December 15, 2010 Weight gain and environmental pollutants might be linked, an award-winning worm researcher suggests.

Living Well Program at UCSF Brings Free Wellness Activities, Expo to Campus

December 09, 2010 During December and throughout 2011, members of the UCSF community can participate in events and activities that can improve their health and well being.

Reducing salt in teen diet could have big impact on future health

November 15, 2010 Cutting back on salt in teenagers’ diets by as little as one-half teaspoon, or three grams, a day, could reduce the number of young adults with high blood pressure by 44 to 63 percent, according to new research presented Sunday, Nov. 14 at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2010 meeting in Chicago.

Soft drink industry should focus on child nutrition in developing world

November 10, 2010 Soft drink companies are well-positioned to help combat child malnutrition in developing countries because of their expanding business and extensive distribution routes.

Dried plum restores bone in aging mice, scientists report

October 05, 2010 A diet supplemented with powdered dried plum restored bone lost by mice during the course of normal aging, in a study led by Bernard P. Halloran, PhD, at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.

Biochemical pathway may link addiction, compulsive eating

September 01, 2010 Ezlopitant, a compound known to suppress craving for alcohol in humans, was shown to decrease consumption of sweetened water by rodents in a study by researchers at the Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center, which is affiliated with UCSF.

Obesity rates decline for many adolescents but disparities worsen

August 16, 2010 Obesity rates have started to decline and level off for many adolescents, but continue to increase for certain racial and ethnic minorities, according to a new UCSF-led study.

Cholesterol levels in young adults predict risk of future heart disease

August 02, 2010 Young people with even modestly elevated cholesterol levels are more likely to develop coronary artery calcium and atherosclerosis later in life, according to a study by UCSF researchers.

UCSF Launches Doctoral Program in Epidemiology & Translational Science

July 14, 2010 UCSF is accepting applications up to August 1 for the kick-off of a new Doctoral Program in Epidemiology and Translational Science this fall.

NEJM Editorial cites toll of disparity on chronic disease

July 13, 2010 The heavy burden of hunger in the United States helps explain why the poor are at higher risk for obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes, according to an editorial in the July 1 New England Journal of Medicine co-authored by two UCSF faculty members.

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