Attending a Dec. 9 luncheon at the US Embassy in Stockholm to honor the American Nobel laureates are, from left, Oliver E. Williamson (Economics), Venkatraman Ramakrishnan (Chemistry), Elinor Ostrom (Economics), Jack Szostak (Medicine), Thomas Steitz (Chemistry), Ambassador Matthew Barzun, George Smith (Physics), Carol Greider (Medicine) and Elizabeth Blackburn (Medicine).
(Photo courtesy of the US Embassy in Stockholm)

Download this image. [72 dpi jpg; 250.58 KB]

Ambassador Matthew Barzun delivers the official toast at the Dec. 9 luncheon to honor American Nobel laureates.
(Photo courtesy of the US Embassy in Stockholm)

Download this image. [72 dpi jpg; 334.53 KB]

UCSF Nobel laureate Elizabeth Blackburn talks with Ambassador Matthew Barzun at a Dec. 9 luncheon.
(Photo courtesy of the US Embassy in Stockholm)

Download this image. [72 dpi jpg; 193.93 KB]

Ambassador Barzun speaks with Nobel laureates, including Elizabeth Blackburn.
(Photo courtesy of the US Embassy in Stockholm)

Download this image. [72 dpi jpg; 270.83 KB]

The scene before guests of Ambassador Barzun sat down for a Dec. 9 luncheon to honor the American Nobel laureates.
(Photo courtesy of the US Embassy in Stockholm)

Download this image. [72 dpi jpg; 368.36 KB]

Nobel Prize-winning scientist Elizabeth Blackburn is flanked by Sam Hawgood, dean of the UCSF School of Medicine, and UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann on Oct. 5, the day the prize was announced.
(Photo by Susan Merrell)

Download this image. [300 dpi jpg;1.24 MB]

Elizabeth Blackburn greets colleagues and the media at an Oct. 5 reception held in Genentech Hall at UCSF Mission Bay to celebrate her being named a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
(Photo by Susan Merrell)

Download this image. [300 dpi jpg;1.15 MB]

UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann, left, joined Elizabeth Blackburn at an Oct. 5 news conference where she was recognized by a proclamation from San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom for being named to receive the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
(Photo by Susan Merrell)

Download this image. [300 dpi jpg;1.15 MB]

Elizabeth Blackburn answers calls from the media in the early morning of Oct. 5 after being named to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
(Photo by Elisabeth Fall/fallfoto.com)

Download this image. [120 dpi jpg;367K]

Elizabeth Blackburn and husband, John Sedat, PhD, got an early wake up call this morning as she was named to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
(Photo by Elisabeth Fall/fallfoto.com)

Download this image. [120 dpi jpg; 441K]

Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, of the University of California, San Francisco
(Photo by Susan Merrell)

Download this image. [300 dpi jpg; 870K]

Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, of the University of California, San Francisco
(Photo by Elisabeth Fall/fallfoto.com)

Download this image. [72 dpi jpg; 370K]

Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, in her lab at the University of California, San Francisco
(Photo by Elisabeth Fall/fallfoto.com)

Download this image. [700 dpi jpg; 585K]

Damaged telomeres have prevented this yeast cell from dividing. Instead, it has continuously replicated its DNA in preparation for division, resulting in numerous copies of DNA, as seen in the multiple bright spots of stained DNA. (Normal cells would display a single bright spot if their DNA were stained.)
(Photo by Blackburn lab.)

Download this image. [300 dpi jpg; 72K]

This image dramatizes a pond microorganism cell with damaged telomeres trying, unsuccessfully, to divide. Telomeres are the last portion of chromosomes to divide. The lit up, elongated filaments shown in the cell are chromosomes that the cell is trying to pull apart. They cannot be separated because they are stuck together.
(Photo by Blackburn lab.)

Download this image.